hip pain

1904, 2017

Osteopathy Treats Hip Bursitis

By |April 19th, 2017|Uncategorised|Comments Off on Osteopathy Treats Hip Bursitis

“When you have adjusted the physical to its normal demands. Nature supplies the remainder.”

Dr Andrew Taylor Still. Founder of Osteopathy

Hip bursitis symptoms most often include a deep aching pain that concentrates on the outside of the hip joint at the top of the outer thigh. This sometimes includes buttock pain which may extend down the outside of the leg towards the knee. The pain is usually intense and sharp in the early stages of the condition and may develop into a dull ache over time.

Normal activities such as walking, climbing stairs, running, sitting cross-legged, getting up from a chair or prolonged standing often aggravate the symptoms. Lying on the hip at night is very painful and may be severe enough that it disturbs your sleep. Putting pressure over the trochanter with your finger increases the pain. Stiffness may develop around the hip joint

The trochanteric bursa is a large fluid filled sac which facilitates the gliding of skin, buttock and thigh tendons over the greater trochanter which is the large bump that can be felt on the outside of the femur or upper leg bone. The bursa has the function of working as a shock absorber and as a lubricant for the movement of the muscles adjacent to it thus preventing friction. Muscles attach to this bony prominence so the hip joint is able to move. When this bursa becomes inflamed and causes pain it’s called trochanteric bursitis. Trochanteric bursitis can strike anyone but seems more prevalent in females and senior patients.

The cause of trochanteric hip bursitis is usually overuse and repeated friction, often as a result of faulty biomechanics. Occasionally it can be caused by a sudden impact to the hip such as a fall […]

2705, 2015

Curtsy Lunges

By |May 27th, 2015|media|Comments Off on Curtsy Lunges

Curtsy Lunges

‘Keeping your knees healthy and symptom free begins with developing a functional understanding of how this unique joint is constructed (anatomy) and how it does and doesn’t function (biomechanics)’

Lunges are excellent dynamic strength exercises for the lower body but can cause pain if not performed properly.

The curtsy lunge is like the standard lunge, but your rear foot moves backward, crossing it behind the front  leg, planting the ball of your rear foot about half a metre across the midline as though you were about to curtsy. In this movement the knee travels across the body vs. the traditional forward and backward motion. The weight used in the exercise has to be lowered drastically. Not just because your muscle can’t handle it, but because there is no chance for your muscles and body’s passive structures to exert enough force in such an extreme, anatomically disadvantageous position.

The curtsy lunge exercise negates one foundational rule of biomechanics. To encourage proper movement pattern, function, and strength, the knee joint, hip joint, and shoulder joint should be kept in alignment with one another the entire time while bearing load. For the grand majority, this will produce unwanted stress since the hip socket doesn’t align with this movement angle or pattern. Consequently, the IT band and TFL will take a loaded stretch.

Increased rotation of the knee causes excessive overstretching or twisting of the ligaments or tendons or increased shearing forces on the bursa surrounding the knee, then ligament strain, tendinitis, meniscus tears, bursitis, iliotibial band and patella femoral syndrome can occur.

The knee is a hinge-type joint, roughly equivalent to a door hinge, but with a slight rotation to lock it into full extension. The meniscus is located between the femur […]

309, 2011

Osteopathy Treats Hip Pain

By |September 3rd, 2011|Uncategorised|0 Comments

Osteopathy Treats Hip Pain. The hip joint is vital to the movement and essential for weight bearing capabilities because it acts as the connection between the legs and torso. As a integral component of the pelvis, the hip joint is strong and stable. However hip pain can be brought on by certain conditions. These include the following:

1) arthritis, which is caused by excessive weight through the hip joint
2) Trochanteric bursitis, when there is inflammation of the bursa over the outside of the hip joint brought on by increased activity;
3) Tendonitis
4) Snapping Hip Syndrome, caused when muscles or ligaments are imbalanced and
5) Hip fractures.

An osteopath can diagnose and help treat the symptoms as well as advise on further testing and an exercise and wellness routine based on a patient’s lifestyle and age.