Shoulder Pain

2102, 2017

Cycling Neck & Shoulder Pain

By |February 21st, 2017|media|Comments Off on Cycling Neck & Shoulder Pain

Cycling Neck & Shoulder Pain

“45 per cent of cyclists suffer from chronic neck pain, which is often worse after a ride”

Wilber et al. 1995

Cycling posture requires bending forward at the low back and hips and maintaining the neck in an extended position to see the road ahead. This unnatural cycling position puts a lot of pressure on the junction between your neck and upper back due to the neck joints compressing against each other which may lead to neck irritation. Looking over your shoulder for traffic and the vibration from the road travelling  along the arms to the neck may be uncomfortable.

Riding with the arms and the weight of the head (typically 5kg) held forward for hours at a time may cause neck and shoulder tension which can cause fatigue and neck pain when cycling long distances. Cycling induced symptoms may include stiffness and discomfort in your neck and/or upper back, headaches, migraines, jaw pain, shoulder muscular aches, pins and needles in your arms and finger tingling.

Neck pain is often maintained by poor posture and weak shoulder girdle mechanics when on the bike. The problem with a bike posture is that it accentuates a poor forward head desk bound posture.

Heavy exertional breathing causes the accessory breathing muscles (scalenes) on the front of the neck to be overused and chronically tighten up. As we fatigue the flexed/hunched posture of the lower and upper back becomes more pronounced affecting the thoracic spine, rib cage and shoulders which then leads to an increase in extension in the neck to look forward.

The body is very good at compensating for slight postural strains or muscular imbalances and it can be a while before the problems manifest as pain. If you have […]

2505, 2015

Tech-No? How technology is affecting our health.

By |May 25th, 2015|media|Comments Off on Tech-No? How technology is affecting our health.

Tech-No?

Technology is pretty cool isn’t it? You want to take a four-minute clip of your kitten playing in a box? No problem. You want to watch Miley twerking 21 times in a row on YouTube? Go wild. You want to make a confession on Twitter? Go on then, embrace those 140 characters.

Despite the convenience of technology, though, research is showing that the gadgets we use every day are doing us a fair amount of harm, both physically and emotionally.

 

It’s messing with your sleep.

Gone are the days when the setting sun meant that it was time for bed. Now, when it gets dark out, TV’s, computers and cellphones light up our lives, and people are awake until all ours browsing the internet or streaming series. But, according to the Harvard Health letter, this is not good news at all, as bright lights at night throw off your body’s biological clock and your sleep cycle suffers as a result.

In a study published in the Applied Ergonomics Journal, research showed that exposure to light from computers and phones can lower levels of the hormone melatonin. This is important, as melatonin regulates your internal clock and plays a roll in your sleep. When precious shut-eye time is affected, general health and well-being decreases.

 

It’s hurting your eyes.

Although it is not specifically  the bright screens that cause, eye trouble, staring at your computer all day can have a negative effect on your vision.

According to optometrist Jacqui Bauer, it’s the shorter distance that the eyes are having to work at that is the real problem.

‘Short distance causes the eyes to focus three times as much and if the visual system isn’t adequate in that regard, it will cause strain, resulting in headaches, […]

1304, 2015

Deadlift

By |April 13th, 2015|media|Comments Off on Deadlift

Deadlift

‘The best exercises are those which mimic natural movement patterns, like the deadlift.’

Young children typically perform squats and deadlifts without anyone having to show them how. Yet when a deconditioned adult tries to perform these movements, they may feel very unnatural. Many adults have spent their entire life sitting in chairs and cars, avoiding natural movement. Many adults and even school children have done this to the point where they have unlearned instinctive habits like lifting from the hips and legs, and replaced them with lower back pain and hip ailments.

In my experience as an ex personal trainer deadlifts improve your performance in everything – from daily tasks, like picking-up groceries or playing with your kids on the floor—to more athletic tasks, like sprinting and jumping.

When beginning the movement, the most susceptible position to injury will be the bottom of the movement, where the spine is more likely to slump (enter lumbar flexion) and has the greatest shear force on it. Start the lift off a rack or bench if you have flexibility issues.

Begin standing up straight with your hips about shoulder-width apart. The bar should be hanging at arm’s length with the overhand grip. The ability to maintain lumbar lordosis is absolutely the most important factor. Once it’s lost, the movement is over. Re-set and try it again. No exceptions. Your knees begin slightly bent, and the movement begins at the hips as they are pushed backwards, while your shins remain close to vertical and weight remains on the heels. Your back should remain straight and never round. In the deadlift the spinal muscles are trained statically, meaning that there is very little movement in the spine throughout the movement. The bar is lowered as […]

502, 2015

Chronic Pain – Muscle Spasms – Neck – Shoulders – Arms

By |February 5th, 2015|testimonials|Comments Off on Chronic Pain – Muscle Spasms – Neck – Shoulders – Arms

I have suffered with pain from muscle spasms in my neck, shoulders and arms for many years due to a combination of bad posture, stress, and a bad motor bike accident.

I have lived with this almost every day and have literally tried almost everything such as continuous massages to eleviate the pain which unfortunately, only gave temporary relief. Also, I have tried acupuncture, trigger point needling, Physiotherapy, Chinese cupping and massage, Ayurvedic massage and herbal remedies, thai massage, chiropractic treatment but had no permanent lasting relief.
I have visited Dr Guy Ashbuner, who has taught me a completely new way of sitting and posture together with certain simple exercices to strengthen sets of muscles together as a whole rather than isolated muscle exercises as they pull and  aggrevate my neck.  He states that the body works as a unit and must be strengthened as a whole.
Having had a series of only five sessions, I am now feeling so much better from strengthening my muscles along with slight adjustments combined with strong sweeping-like massage done with the back of his forearms in certain areas to soften and loosen muscle which felt blocked and locked to the spine which impaired my mobility. It even improved my eye sight which had also been effected, it’s rather remarkable!
I would highly recommend osteopathy to anyone. Dr Ashburner shows a great interest in his client’s wellbeing and he also writes extremely helpful and interesting articles on various related topics.
Many thanks for all your help.

Lisa Georgiou

401, 2015

Forward Head Posture

By |January 4th, 2015|Uncategorised|0 Comments

Posture affects and moderates every physiologic function from breathing to hormonal production. Spinal pain, headache, mood, blood pressure, pulse and lung capacity are among the functions most easily influenced by posture.”- American Journal of Pain Management 1994, 4:36-39.Forward Head Posture (FHP) can be recognised by the positioning of the ear being forward of the shoulder, rather than sitting directly over it. With today’s lifestyle, this condition occurs in between 66% and 90% of the population.

Forward Head Posture can be caused by performing activities that focus our attention directly in front of us with habitual poor posture. Adults and students sitting with shoulders rounded and back hunched whilst driving or working at their computers the whole day, looking into a microscope, texting on a cell phone, reading or sitting on the couch. Children develop forward head posture watching television, playing video games, and carrying heavy backpacks on their way to school. For every inch your head posture sits forward, the head gains 4.5kgs in weight. This forces the muscles in your upper back and neck to work much harder to keep the head (chin) from dropping forwards onto your chest, thus throwing the whole spine out of alignment .With your muscles in constant contraction to achieve this, pressure is added to the nerves at the base of the skull, which can cause headaches.

Forward head posture could result in as much as a 30% loss of lung capacity. Due to FHP the upper ribs are not be able to elevate properly during inhalation. Some studies show that FHP over time can contribute to disc degeneration, nerve impingement, bulging discs, or chronic back pain. In simple terms, the pressure of the spine radiating from the cervical spine (neck) […]

2008, 2014

Sort yourself out today…Shoulder pain

By |August 20th, 2014|media|Comments Off on Sort yourself out today…Shoulder pain

Back and shoulder pain is a common complaint due to our sedentary lifestyles and bad posture. Nearly 50% of us will suffer at some point in our lives -our experts are here to help you avoid it.

The Osteopath

Dr Guy Ashburner is a Cape Town-based osteopath

Painful shoulder conditions that limit movement are common, and are caused by injuries affecting the muscles, tendons, ligaments and cartilage. As the shoulder has a high degree of flexibility, it’s less stable and more prone to injuries than other joints. As the nerves that supply the shoulder and arm originate from the neck and upper spine, conditions such as spinal dysfunction commonly contribute to pain in the shoulder. To determine the cause of your pain, the osteopath will conduct a full orthopedic and neurological examination of the shoulder, neck and upper back. When a diagnosis has been reached, the osteopath will discuss the treatment options with you. Although shoulder pain can be serious, the vast majority of injuries are not serious and can easily be helped.

The Physiotherapist

Kerryn Alcock runs a practice in Linden, Joburg

The shoulder is made up of three bones: the clavicle (collarbone), the scapula (shoulder blade) and the humerus (upper arm bone). Shoulder pain is often related to occupation or sport, overuse or ‘wear and tear’ also results in a painful shoulder and this can come with age. To ensure a good prognosis, early treatment is essential in order to prevent stiffness, over-stretching of ligaments or tendons, weakness and further injury. Simple exercises can be done at home such as pendular exercises done while lying on your stomach with your arm off the bed or while standing, bending over slightly or leaning on a chair. Relax your arm and […]

1408, 2014

Posture and your child

By |August 14th, 2014|Uncategorised|0 Comments

Posture and your child.

 “As the twig is bent, so grows the tree”  William Garner Sutherland (1873 – 1954) Founder of Cranial Osteopathy

A growing body of evidence shows that poor posture in childhood can lead to a lifetime of chronic pain, fatigue, and low self­ esteem. Children naturally imitate the behaviour of adults around them. If you care about your posture, so will your children. But that isn’t the only reason to take care of your own posture, you will be a more energetic and pain­-free parent as a result.

“School age children spend a growing amount of their free time watching TV or playing with hand­held devices. Many people have unsupportive furniture in their living rooms, leaving children mould their spines to the shape of the sofa and reinforcing their bad habits. In most cases, kids often hunch over when they are executing a task, walking, or even seated. This is compounded by sitting all day and carrying weighty backpacks at school. With time, the adverse effects add up to severe problems later in life.

Good posture is when your child’s back has the least amount of strain placed on it through keeping bones and joints aligned properly, allowing muscles to be used properly as well. Good posture naturally happens when the upper body’s muscles are balanced in strength and used uniformly. Bad posture can result in stress on the spine at certain levels. For instance the slouched position can put a lot of unnecessary loading on the middle back spinal region, which can lead to jutting forward of the head and jaw. This then leads to headaches and the inability to concentrate. This slumped posture can also effect the efficiency of breathing and gut motility. Poor posture also can […]

308, 2014

No Muscle Left Behind – Muscle Imbalance

By |August 3rd, 2014|media|Comments Off on No Muscle Left Behind – Muscle Imbalance

Muscle Left Behind – Muscle Imbalance. To get a strong and sculpt a sleek silhouette, you have to identify which muscles are slacking and whip them into shape.

Nearly every muscle in your body has a corresponding muscle group that carries out the opposite function. Take your biceps and triceps: their even match-up lets you bend and straighten your elbow without any thought. That’s how it should work, at least. Unfortunately, everyday habits (like sitting at a desk), repetitive workouts (say, that marathon you’re training for, or your weekly abs class) and even your wardrobe (yes your skyscraper heels) threaten these partnerships.

The result:one of the muscles becomes stronger and overpowers the other, a common condition known as muscular imbalance, which can worsen poor posture and wreak havoc on your figure, says trainer Melissa Paris. (tight hip flexors, for example, can tilt your hips forward and give you a “boep”.) Correcting them , she adds, helps elongate your silhouette and can actually make you look slimmer.

Chain reaction

Muscles, ligaments, tendons and bones are all connected through an intricate system , known to trainers and doctors as the kinetic chain. When one link in the chain is dodgy, it starts a reaction through the rest of your body. So your back pain could actually stem from a problem with your shoulder, your knee or even your shin. As with any team, when one muscle’s not keeping up, others have to work harder to compensate. “The danger of muscular imbalances is that they alter your natural movement patterns,” cautions personal trainer Karen Joseph. “Over time, they can pull your bones and joints out of alignment, which often leads to pain and injury.” The result, says Cape Town -based osteopath Guy […]

2907, 2014

Lat pulldowns- Proper technique and how to avoid Injury.

By |July 29th, 2014|media|Comments Off on Lat pulldowns- Proper technique and how to avoid Injury.

Lat pulldowns are a popular gym exercise for strengthening the upper back, shoulders, biceps and forearms and is without a doubt the most frequently misused piece of equipment in the gym.
This week I saw a prime example of what not to do with Lat pulldowns.  An over enthusiastic man in his late thirties holding the bar with an extra wide grip yanking the bar down quickly behind his head which forced his neck forward and bent his whole spine into a unnatural bent forward position.
Here is some guidance on how to avoid making mistakes which may result in injury and help you achieve your fitness goals.
Exercisers should grasp the bar with palms facing away from you (pronated) and with a grip at or about shoulder width apart or where comfortable with the hands evenly spaced on the bar. If you are experiencing rotator cuff issues (a group of four muscles that provide shoulder stability) or shoulder pain, switch the handle attachment so your palms face each other giving you better leverage and an even closer grip which can sometimes alleviate the shoulder strain. Lat pulldown bars are long with curve at each end giving people incorrect notions about how far apart their hands should be.  Gripping the bar wider compromises the ability of the body to work as a unit and increases the potential for shoulder injuries.
Exercisers should lean back slightly and pull the bar to the upper chest or sternum. This will allow the head to be moved away from the cable and bar and reduce the need to turn the head to the side especially with heavy resistances and help reduce neck strain and injury. Leaning back slightly will also ensure that the […]

303, 2014

Muscle Imbalance

By |March 3rd, 2014|Uncategorised|0 Comments

Poor posture can create muscle imbalance throughout the body. Some muscles can become shortened and tightened while opposing muscles can become lengthened and weakened.

Forward head posture with slumped spine and rounded shoulders is a common trait among office workers. This poor posture causes the muscles in the back to be stretched while the chest, rib and abdominal muscles become tightened. These imbalances may cause stress at joints and the involved muscles can pull unevenly on the bones they attach to, which can lead to pain and dysfunctional movements.

Muscle imbalance occurs in different ways based on daily lifestyle habits, physical activity, an individual’s body shape, previous surgeries or physical trauma, etc. A muscle imbalance causes the body to compensate, which sooner or later results in various musculoskeletal disorders—headaches, jaw dysfunction, neck pain, shoulder tension and pain, frozen shoulder, all forms of back pain, Sciatica, hip pain, knee pain, muscle tension and joint degeneration over the long term (osteoarthritis).

Osteopathic care combined with appropriate exercise prescription is an effective way of treating muscle imbalances. Being professionally assessed is the first step to helping alleviate muscle imbalance concern, pain, or dysfunction. Once you have been diagnosed by an Osteopath, treatment to help correct this imbalance can begin. Firstly an assessment and analysis is performed to establish how serious the problem is and then, if appropriate, treatment is performed to mobilize structures, balancing body mechanics, and freeing up the structures causing the symptoms. This reduces pain and increases balance and symmetry.

Ultimately the aim is not just to treat it but prevent the symptoms from reoccurring. This includes education on how to keep the area in question healthy in the future.

Moving naturally and normally is the best way to attain muscle […]