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Burpees – Balancing the risk vs. reward

“Take care of your body. It’s the only place you have to live.” Jim Rohn The Burpee is an exercise that was devised by Royal H. Burpee, an American psychologist in the 1930s. It was originally used as a“Burpees test” which consisted of a short number of “Burpees”executed in rapid succession to measure agility, coordination and strength. This test was utilized by the military to assess soldiers who need is to be able to drop into a firing position and then bounce back up lightning-fast to move to a safe position.

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Chronic Shoulder Tension

“When you have adjusted the physical to its normal demands nature supplies the remainder” Dr A T Still, Founder of Osteopathy. 1874 Chronic tension in the neck and shoulders is an extremely common complaint amongst many people, and the problem can have many underlying causes. The long and stressful hours people spend sitting at desks leave them with muscular discomfort that they carry out of the office like a weight on their shoulders.

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Morning Stiffness

“We conclude that when the fluids of the body are stopped in the fascia, organs and other parts of the system, stagnation, fermentation, heat and general confusion will follow …” Dr. A.T. Still, D.O. (Founder of Osteopathy) 1874 Do you find it unbearable to get out of the bed the first thing in the morning because of the pain which you feel? – be it a stiff neck, sore back, or other issues.

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Tackling in Children’s Rugby

“Teaching proper tackle technique is imperative to allow players to be successful and run a low risk of injury” Hendricks and Lambert, 2010 Many youngsters enjoy rugby, especially playing rugby. Tackling in rugby is an art form, that when performed correctly can allow the smallest players on the pitch to stop the largest. Rugby is a physical game and a contact sport. Yes, the players get injured. Just as they do in athletics, gymnastics, horse riding, soccer, and indeed virtually every sport.

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Dangers of Over Stretching

“Stretching may increase your flexibility, but you will most likely be weaker and the results are often short-lived. In 2004, a report published by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) questioned the efficacy of stretching; noting that more than 350 studies conducted over four decades had failed to establish that stretching prior to activity prevents injury.” When you stretch, you take your muscle to the point where you can feel a slight pull and hold this position for a few seconds without pain or discomfort.

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Crunches are bad for your back

Any repetitive exercise, with or without load, where the lumbar spine is allowed to flex, round, or flatten, will over-stress the discs and ligaments. Stuart McGill, a professor of spine bio-mechanics at the University of Waterloo, Canada. Crunches and sit-ups involve lying on your back and repeatedly bending and extending your spine. Any forward bending motion of the torso such as sit-ups, crunches, rope pull-down crunches, toes to bar, knee to elbows, roll downs or touch our toes causes a significant increase in lower back intradiscal pressure.

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Dem bones, dem bones, dem dry bones: your bone health

When Sophy Kohler had her first, and as it turned out last, ju-jitsu lesson, the martial arts instructor fractured her sternum. Kohler, who is now 29 and works in publishing, felt “strangely thankful” towards him, because it led to her diagnosis of osteopenia – pre-osteoporosis – and then later osteoporosis, a condition in which the bones become less dense and more likely to fracture. Kohler had also suffered a knee injury the previous year.

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Don't Foam-Roll-Massage your Iliotibial Band (IT Band)

Foam rolling has become increasingly popular as a method of self-massage in an effort to work out muscle knots and tension. However, rolling out your iliotibial band, up and down, is likely to make you grimace in pain. Anatomically, the IT band (ITB) is a longitudinal fibrous band of deep fascia that originates from the gluteus maximus (buttock)and tensor fascia lata (front side of pelvis) then continues as a tendinous, fascial band that runs from the pelvis down along the outside of the thigh to below the knee, attaching on the outside of the lower leg bone (the tibia).

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Osteopathy – hands-on therapy for your child

‘As the twig is bent, so grows the tree’ ~ William Garner Sutherland (1873 – 1954) founder of cranial osteopathy Osteopathic philosophy is based on the idea that the body works best when it moves as nature intended. FROM THE BEGINNING Birthing is physically demanding for the baby due to structural adaptive changes that take place. These structural changes are usually self-correcting soon after birth, but not always, leaving behind varying degrees of potentially problematic restrictions.

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Osteopathic treatment for fertility

While modern technology enables doctors to enhance parts of the conception process, the price tag is high and investigations do not always find the reason for infertility. However, in recent years, health care consciousness is shifting from medical procedures and pharmaceutical-driven methods to healthy natural approaches for the treatment of infertility. Osteopathic treatment combines an extensive knowledge of anatomy, physiology, and biomechanics to restore structural freedom in the tissues, enhance fluid flow throughout the body, and create the optimal environment for nature to take its natural course.

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